How is a Developmental Optometrist Evaluation Different from a Vision Test?

How is a Developmental Optometrist Evaluation Different from a Vision Test?


Parents often tell their child “Passed the eye exam," which was most likely performed at school or the baby’s visit to the pediatrician's office. While a child's visual acuity test may not have indicated a defect, some visual skill impairments might exist. Occupational therapists are often dealing with difficulties related to visual abilities, which is why it's recommended to visit a developmental optometrist evaluation for a better eye evaluation.

Many people who face eye problems are unaware of the distinctions between a developmental optometrist evaluation and a vision test. Sure, they sound the same as a vision test. Still, the services they provide are significantly different from one to the other. If you, or someone you know, has a vision problem that is not getting fixed even with glasses, contact lenses, or frequent checkups, then this article is for all of these people.

Developmental optometrist Vs. regular optometrist

Suppose you're looking for an optometrist with higher qualifications; in that case, you must meet a developmental optometrist. These specialists take several years of post-graduate study to become developmental optometrists. Knowing the difference between an optometrist and a developmental optometrist is crucial for choosing the right therapy. Let's dive in.

What's the diagnosis procedure with optometrists or vision test conductors?

A typical optometrist can diagnose general eye problems, prescribe medications for therapy, and write prescriptions for spectacles or contact lenses. Patients' overall eye health, visual acuity (20/20, 20/40, etc.), and corrective treatments are assessed by optometrists. While these are crucial vision components, these tests do not reveal other visual abnormalities that might impact reading, learning, and memory. A standard eye exam may miss some vision impairment symptoms when it comes to eye teaming (binocular perception), focusing, tracking, and visual processing.

What's the diagnosis procedure with developmental optometrist evaluation?

Functional vision issues such as lazy eye, eye movement, and depth perception, as well as visual impairments following brain trauma, are treated by a developmental optometrist. These visual issues affect academic performance, stroke and head injuries, and Parkinson's Disease or other neurological disorders. Standard vision tests may miss these vision issues since it doesn’t involve comprehensive evaluation and tests. Prisms, lenses, and vision therapy are all used by developmental optometrists to develop and enhance vision. Others specialize in specialized areas, such as children's vision and sports vision.

How Does Behavioral Optometry Aim to Achieve These Goals over Normal Vision Tests?

A developmental optometry evaluation will help for the following:

  • To prevent the development or deterioration of eyesight and eye disorders.
  • For the treatment of existing eyesight impairments
  • To guarantee that the visual talents necessary for academic success, job, sports, and computer use are well-developed and operating effectively.

How is developmental optometry evaluation done and helpful?

During a developmental optometry assessment, the following will be tested:

  • The ability of the eyes to focus on a distant object or picture.
  • Assuring that both eyes are working in sync.
  • It is possible to follow a moving object or text in a book by using eye-tracking technology.
  • The brain's ability to "process" what the eyes see.

The results will assist the developmental optometrist choice of ideal treatment, whether general vision therapy, special glasses, or even medications.

Wrap up!

If you notice irritation or itching in the eyes or your kid is facing some vision issue, it is always recommended to visit for an eye test. Any one of these reasons might be a real cause to arrange a complete eye evaluation with a developmental optometrist rather than a general vision test.

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